School Seminar: Socio-Technical HCI for Ethical Value Exchange: Lessons from India


Abstract
Ethical value exchange is moving to the forefront of the global challenges that HCI will have to address in the coming years. We argue that applying a context-sensitive, socio-technical approach to HCI can help meet this challenge. The background is that the life of marginalized people in contemporary society is challenging and uncertain. The marginalized can face health and cognitive issues as well as a lack of stability in social structures such as family, work and social inclusion. Three questions are of concern when innovating together with people ‘at the margins’: how can we describe users without stereotyping badly, what socio-technical HCI methods fit the local context, and how to make the design sustainable in the face of current planetary challenges (e.g., climate change)? We discuss a socio-technical HCI approach called human work interaction design (HWID) to meet the challenges of designing for ethical value exchange where value extraction is not dominated by one party but equally shared across all stakeholders. We introduce an ongoing case of a digital service to support fishers in Alibaug, India. As a multidisciplinary team of researchers we evaluate the socio-technical infrastructure surrounding a mobile app to support sustainable fishing. This is done through the lens of HWID by highlighting inwardly and outwardly socio-technical relations between human work and interaction design.  We conclude by highlighting the value of a context sensitive, ethical socio-technical framework for HCI.

Bio
Dr. José Abdelnour Nocera is Associate Professor in Sociotechnical Design and Head of the Sociotechnical Centre for Innovation and User Experience at the University of West London. He is the current Chair forUNESCO IFIP TC 13.8 working group in Interaction Design for International Development as well as Chair for the British Computer Society Sociotechnical SpecialistGroup. His interests lie in the sociotechnical and cultural aspects of systems design, development and use. In pursuing these interests, he has been involved as researcher and consultant in several projects in the UK and overseas in the domains of mHealth, e-learning, social development, ecommerce, e-governance and enterprise resource planning systems. He gained an MSc in Social Psychology from Simon Bolivar University, Venezuela, and a PhD inComputing from The Open University, UK. He is currently conducting research on a British Academy funded project on Socio-cultural and human interaction approaches in the design of interventions to support students at risk in South African Universities.

 



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